BJJ INSTRUCTIONALS VIDEOS — 04 February 2014
David Avellan’s “Kimura Trap” System!

As a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu junkie that is always looking for a new strategy, setup or technique to learn, it’s quite often that I find myself drugging through the deep, dark depths of the internet to find something new to devour and learn from.

Often times I’ll go on Google binges for hours on end till I find something that peaks my interest enough to stop and look into a little bit more.  When I find myself with something I want to watch, I dive in head first!bjj-blog-1.23.13

Recently, this was the case when I came across the Kimura Trap series from David Avellan.

Having heard about this series beforehand, I was intrigued enough to give it a shot, and see what I could take away from it.  Having known prior to the series who Avellan is, and the effective finishing rate at which the kimura can yield when executed properly, I didn’t hesitate to give this a shot.

Outside of the obvious kimura lock, I really didn’t know what to expect going into the series.  But now having finished with the series, I can say that I learned plenty about this setup through clear instruction and excellent detail.

The Fundamental Kimura Lock From Closed Guard

For more tips on the closed guard, check out http://www.beginningbjj.com/lesson-BJJ-Guard-Posture-Mistakes.html.

Give my background in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Martial Arts as a whole; I’m a firm believer in the old adage “you have to crawl before you can walk.”  Over the years, I found it all too easy to get caught up in the moment and want to learn something crazy and over the top because of how cool it looked when I didn’t even know where to start in the first place!

Obviously this series is based around the kimura lock setup, a move that many of us learned in the very early stages of our grappling careers.  The sign of a good DVD series is when the instructor takes time out to cover every little detail included in the moves, which is what David Avellan did with the kimura trap.

Rather than just assume you know how to do it, David took time in one segment to make sure he addressed the original kimura lock, something you have to know if you want to be able to utilize what he offers in this series.

There were times even in this segment where I found myself jotting down notes.  David makes a good point that I never through about: after breaking their posture, pop your hips upwards so that their bodyweight shifts to their hands!

Simple yet very, very effective!

As far as I’m concerned, you can never know too much about the foundations of grappling.  Even for someone that eats, sleeps and breathes the sport of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu such as myself, this segment was something I was engulfed in and found my pen dancing all over my notebook!

Learning The Kimura Lockdown

One thing that I look for in my grappling DVDs is the flow and continuity of the techniques.  Do they relate with one another?  Is the flow from technique to technique practical?  Is there a common bond among the moves that are being discussed?

With that in mind, I was very impressed with the layout of how Avellan went about breaking down these techniques.  Given my personal rubric for DVD continuity, all three of the above requirements were met.

For instance, in every technique, David shows us how to execute specific setups and moves using the kimura hold as its origin.  Not only were these submission holds, but general setups and even take down defenses!

Each segment flowed smoothly from one to the next, without leaving you as if there was a missing piece to the puzzle somewhere lost in translation.

Before getting to this certain section in the series, there was one thing I was unsure I’d be able to pull off, and that was the kimura lockdown technique that David uses.

Having seen many videos of the move done at live speed, I was hesitant at first.  However, when David took his time to break this sequence down and really highlight the do’s and don’ts, I felt much more confident in being able to pull this move off.

The clear cut instructions that David gives in this series was very beneficial.  Without being too wordy and in-depth, Avellan really does a good job of getting the point across while being very descriptive in a way that allows you to learn without feeling as if you were being spoon fed the information.

For someone that loves details and insight, I really felt as if I was getting a private lesson at times.  There was definitely no stone left unturned, and before I knew it, my note pad was chalk full of breakdowns and nuggets of information!

A Practical & Proven Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Strategy

After going through this series, I sat back and dug into my notes.  I found quickly that one thing I thoroughly enjoyed from this series was the practicality of it all.  Like I stated earlier in the article, the kimura is one of the most basic, foundational moves grapplers have in their toolbox of moves and techniques.

Given that fact, I feel Avellan had an excellent approach to this series.  Quite often DVDs will be released with a heavy emphasis on certain moves that only advanced grapplers can execute, where as David casted a much wider net to encompass a larger demographic of grapplers.

Despite the “basic” nature of just your typical kimura lock, I enjoyed the way this series showed how you can utilize the general kimura hold from all sorts of positions.

When grapplers film projects on the current trend, those types of DVD series seemingly fall by the waist side rather abruptly, but given the staying power of the kimura lock, it seems that David Avellan found the right move to highlight for this series, and delivers some wonderful techniques for grapplers of all skill level.

See the full review of David Avellan’s “Kimura Trap” System at Scienceofskill.com.

Dan Faggella

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