HEALTH Strength and Conditioning — 13 January 2014
Dealing with Back Pain

Everyone at some point in their lives suffers from back pain.  There are many things that can set this in motion.  Not stretching before exercise, tweaking it at just the right angle, or by doing simple every day, repetitive movements.  Some people do not know how to get rid of their back pain, or they don’t realize how bad it really is, or perhaps its not enough to make you uncomfortable but is just an annoying pain.  You could try going to your doctor, or a chiropractor, massage, occupational therapy, physical therapy etc.  There are a ton of different treatments out there. Human back

Non specific back pain is just that – the doctors cannot identify why you are getting back pain and call it “non specific back pain.”  Back pain comes from doing repetitive movements as I stated above.  The most common repetitive strain is carpal tunnel.  This is cause from when the tissues in your wrist become so overworked that damage occurs from these movements.  The same concept occurs in back pain but no one ever thinks to consider this.  If you do the same motion(s) over and over again, it is going to put some kind of strain on whatever tissues you are using.  It’s like not changing the oil in your car, it eventually wears out and breaks down.  It is not caused by a single act of doing one thing – again it is from doing the same movement over and over again.  For more information on how to reduce your back pain check out this article at ScienceofSkill.com.

Your back is in constant movement.  It is stabilizing your spine, keeping your balance, helping you move.  Your back is always doing something, and over working it will cause it to break down.  Think about when you overwork yourself.  You’re in pain and in need of rest – you can overwork your back.  All of the things that are causing your back pain need to be addressed.  If they are not, you will continue to have back pain.

When you go to doctor or chiropractor, PT, OT or any of those people, they will most likely give you a sheet of exercises you can do at home.  They are not exactly helpful.  They are probably some of the worst stretches to do for you back.  You need proper coaching to know how to do the stretches correctly.  Trying to do them on your own, without actually knowing how to do them can cause more harm than good, this is why you need to be shown how to do them in the first place, not just handed a sheet of paper.

Taking medications when in pain can also cause damage.  Your back needs time to heal and is in pain for a reason.  If you take medications to help with the pain, which most of us do, it can cause you to cause more damage.  By lessening the pain you are able to do the movements that cause the damage in the first place, causing even more damage.  Sure you’re not in pain for the time being, but when the pain meds wear off, chances are you are going to be in more pain than you were to begin with.

Having lower back pain can definitely hinder you in everyday life.  There are many other things you can do to help with your lower back pain.  If you are in pain to begin with, rest.  Working through the pain is just going to cause more issues.  You back needs time to heal.  Your everyday activities can cause your pain as well.  Make sure you have good posture, stop hunching forward and sit up straight.  Working on your core muscles can also help with back pain.  Having a strong core helps prevent injury.  Your core muscles are used in almost everything you do.

By making a few simple changes in your everyday lifestyles, you can help lessen any pain your have now or help prevent any further damage.  Remember it is not one simple movement that causes these kinds of issues, it is repetitive everyday movements.

Check out Eric Wongs new Bullet Proof Back for more ways to reduce your back pain!

 

Dan Faggella

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